Glögg

Glögg ( perhaps some pictures of this later today )

First of all there are perhaps a 1000 recipes for this. Let me say this, most of the time after the Glögg you fancy the spinning floor or room. I do not drink often but Glögg is an exception.

enjoy

Ingredients
2 cinnamon sticks, broken into pieces
1 tsp cardamom pods
1 small piece ginger, peeled
Grated zest of 1/2 orange
6 whole cloves
1/2 cup vodka
1 750-ml bottle dry red wine
1 cup ruby port or Madeira
1 cup sugar
1 tbsp vanilla sugar
1/2 cup blanched whole almonds
1/2 cup dark raisins
Directions

1. Crush the cinnamon and cardamom using a mortar and pestle (or put them on a cutting board and crush them with the bottom of a heavy pot.) Put them in a small glass jar and add the ginger, orange zest, cloves, and vodka. Let stand for 24 hours.

2. Strain the vodka through a fine sieve into a large saucepan; discard the spices. Add the red wine, port or Madeira, sugar, vanilla sugar, almonds, and raisins, and heat over medium heat just until bubbles start to form around the edges.

3. Serve the glögg hot in mugs, with a few almonds and raisins in each one. Keep any remaining glögg warm over very low heat until ready to serve (do not let boil.)

Avaite ( danish vodka for the better )

From Wikapedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulled_wine
Nordic glögg

Glögg, gløgg, and similar words are the terms used for mulled wine in the Nordic countries (sometimes misspelled as glog or glug). It is spelled gløgg in Norwegian and Danish, glögg in Swedish and Icelandic, glögi in Estonian and in Finnish.

Non-alcoholic and alcoholic versions of glögg can be bought ready-made or prepared with fruit juices instead of wine. The main classic ingredients (of alcoholic glögg) are red wine, sugar, spices such as cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, cloves, and bitter orange, and optionally also stronger spirits such as vodka, akvavit, or brandy. Throughout Scandinavia, glögg spice extract and ready-mixed spices can be purchased in grocery stores. To prepare glögg, spices and/or spice extract are mixed into the wine, which is then heated to 60-70°C. When preparing homemade glögg using spices, the hot mixture is allowed to infuse for at least an hour, often longer, and then reheated before serving. Ready-made wine glögg (and low- or non-alcoholic varieties) is normally sold at Systembolaget in Sweden, and in Alko in Finland, ready to heat and serve, and not in concentrate or extract form. Glögg is generally served with raisins, blanched almonds and Ginger biscuits (Ginger Snaps), and is a popular hot drink during the Christmas season.

In Sweden, ginger bread and lussebullar (also called lussekatter), a type of sweet bun with saffron and raisins, are typically served. It is also traditionally served at Julbord, the Christmas buffet. In Denmark, gløgg pairings typically include aebleskiver sprinkled with powdered sugar and accompanied with strawberry marmalade. In Norway, gløgg is paired with rice pudding (Norwegian: riskrem). In such cases, the word graut-/grøtfest is more precise, taking the name from the rice pudding which is served as a course. Typically, gløgg is drunk before eating the rice pudding, which is often served with cold, red cordial (saus).

Glögg recipes vary widely; variations with white wine or sweet wine such as Port or Madeira, or spirits such as brandy or whisky are also popular. Glögg can also be made without alcohol by replacing the wine with fruit or berry juices (often blackcurrant) or by boiling the glögg to evaporate the alcohol. Readymade non-alcoholic glögg is also available.[5] Glögg is similar in taste to modern Wassail or mulled

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Comments
2 Responses to “Glögg”
  1. i am going to try this for sure!

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